Gallery Event

Hidden

California-based photojournalist Cristina Salvador Klenz brings a collection of rare, intimate photographs featuring the Roma families living along the West Coast. Beginning in 1990 and working as a staff photographer for the Press-Telegram, Salvador Klenz spent nearly 30 years earning the trust of a number of families belonging to various “nations” of Roma and documenting their lives on black-and-white, 35mm film.

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Tu-2: i to I, Mind to Heart

The Luckman Gallery is pleased to present Taiwanese-American artist Tu-2. This exhibition includes a small survey of Tu-2’s early Mao-ology work, selections from his 108 series of blue and silver portraits made through “meditative mark-making” using only one silver pencil on blue paper, and selections of his new work. A large section of the gallery has been transformed into a meditation refuge where viewers and students alike are invited to stay and practice mindfulness as well as learn about meditation practices.

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Recelebration

Recelebration is a group exhibition of recent acquisitions from the Luckman Permanent Collection. 

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Ethan Russell

Presented in conjuction with his stage show entitled The Best Seat In The House, a retrospective exhibition of acclaimed photographer Ethan Russell’s prolific career will be on display in the Luckman Gallery.

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Pacific Standard Time: La/LA

How to Read El Pato Pascual: Disney’s Latin America and Latin America’s Disney is an attempt to engage with the idea that there are no clean boundaries in art, culture, and geography, and to deconstruct how such notions are formed and disputed. For over seventy-five years, the Walt Disney Company has continuously looked to Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America for content, narratives, and characters, beginning with Donald Duck’s first role in the Mexican-themed Don Donald (1937). The 1971 text by Chilean scholars Ariel Dorfman and Armand Mattelart—Para leer al Pato Donald—considered Disney comic books as a form of cultural imperialism, and the curators have used its arguments as a starting point to show that Disney cannot be seen as something simply exported to the rest of the Americas, and passively received. Like any other cultural force or mythology in Latin America, Disney imagery has always been quickly reinterpreted, assimilated, adapted, cannibalized, syncretized, and subverted in popular culture and the fine arts.

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